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Some Simple Steps to Social Media Privacy

When was the last time you checked your privacy settings on your social media profiles? Being aware of the information you share is a critical step in securing your online identity. Below we’ve outlined some of the top social media sites and what you can do today to help keep your personal information safe.

FACEBOOK Social Media Privacy

Click the padlock icon in the upper right corner of Facebook, and run a Privacy
Checkup. This will walk you through three simple steps:

  • Who you share status updates with
  • A list of the apps that are connected to your Facebook page
  • How personal information from your profile is shared.

As a rule of thumb, we recommend your Facebook Privacy setting be set to “Friends Only” to avoid sharing your information with strangers. You can confirm that all of your future posts will be visible to “Friends Only” by reselecting the padlock and clicking “Who can see my stuff?” then select “What do other people see on my timeline” and review the differences between your public and friends only profile. Oh, and don’t post anything stupid!

TWITTER Social Media Privacy

Click on your profile picture. Select settings. From here you will see about 15 areas on the left-hand side. It’s worth it to take the time to go through each of them and select what works for you. We especially recommend spending time in the “Security and Privacy” section where you should:

  • Enable login verification. Yes, it’s an extra step to access your account, but it provides increased protection against unauthorized access of your account.
  • Require personal information whenever a password reset request is made. It’s not foolproof, but this setting will at least force a hacker to find out your associated email address or phone number if they attempt to reset your password.
  • Determine how private you want your tweets to be. You can limit who (if anybody) is allowed to tag you in photos and limit your posts to just those you follow.
  • Turn off the option called “Add a location to my Tweets”.
  • Uncheck the options that allow others to find you via email address or phone number.
  • Finally, go to the Apps section and check out which third-party apps you’ve allowed access to your Twitter account (and in some cases, post on your behalf) and revoke access to anything that seems unfamiliar or anything that you know you don’t use anymore.

Oh, and don’t post anything stupid!

INSTAGRAM Social Media Privacy

The default setting on Instagram is public, which means that anyone can see the pictures you post. If you don’t want to share your private photos with everyone, you can easily make your Instagram account private by following the steps below. NOTE: you must use your smartphone to change your profile settings; it does not work from the website.

  • Tap on your profile icon (picture of person), then the gear icon* to the right of your name.
  • Select Private Account. Now only people you approve can see your photos and videos.
  • Spend some time considering which linked accounts you want to keep and who can push notifications to you.

*Icons differ slightly depending on your smartphone. Visit the Instagram site for specifics and for more in depth controls.

Oh, and don’t post anything stupid!

SNAPCHAT Social Media Privacy

Snapchat’s settings are really basic, but there’s one setting that can help a lot: If you don’t want just anybody sending you photos or videos, make sure you’re using the default setting to only accept incoming pictures from “My Friends.”  By default, only users you add to your friends list can send you Snaps. If a Snapchatter you haven’t added as a friend tries to send you a Snap, you’ll receive a notification that they added you, but you will not receive the Snap they sent unless you add them to your friends list.  Here are some other easy tips for this site:

  • If you want to change who can send you snaps or view your story, click the snapchat icon and then the gear (settings) icon in the top right hand corner. Scroll down to the “Who can…” section and make your selections.
  • Like all services, make sure you have a strong and unique password.
  • Remember, there are ways to do a screen capture to save and recover images, so no one should develop a false sense of “security” about that.

In other words, (all together now) don’t post anything stupid!

A Final Tip: The privacy settings for social media sites change frequently. Check in at least once a month to ensure your privacy settings are still as secure as possible and no changes have been made.

John Sileo is an an award-winning author and keynote speaker on identity theft, internet privacy, fraud training & technology defense. John specializes in making security entertaining, so that it works. John is CEO of The Sileo Group, whose clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security & Pfizer. John’s body of work includes appearances on 60 Minutes, Rachael Ray, Anderson Cooper & Fox Business. Contact him directly on 800.258.8076.

12th Day: Holiday Security Tips All Wrapped up Together

Would you like to give the people you care about some peace on earth during this holiday season? Take a few minutes to pass on our 12 privacy tips that will help them protect their identities, social media, shopping and celebrating over the coming weeks. The more people that take the steps we’ve outlined in the 12 Days of Christmas, the safer we all become, collectively.

Have a wonderful holiday season, regardless of which tradition you celebrate. Now sing (and click) along with us one more time.  

On the 12th Day of Christmas, the experts gave to me: 12 Happy Holidays,

11 Private Emails,

10 Trusted Charities

9 Protected Packages

8 Scam Detectors

7 Fraud Alerts

6 Safe Celebrations

Fiiiiiiiiiiive Facebook Fixes

4 Pay Solutions

3 Stymied Hackers

2 Shopping Tips

And the Keys to Protect My Privacy

John Sileo is an an award-winning author and keynote speaker on identity theft, internet privacy, fraud training & technology defense. John specializes in making security entertaining, so that it works. John is CEO of The Sileo Group, whose clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security & Pfizer. John’s body of work includes appearances on 60 Minutes, Rachael Ray, Anderson Cooper & Fox Business. Contact him directly on 800.258.8076.

iCloud Hacked for Nude Jennifer Lawrence Photos? How to Keep from Being Next

Unless you’ve been living under a rock (or haven’t been on the internet in the past 24 hours), you most likely know that intimate photos of celebrities like Jennifer Lawrence and Kate Upton have been exposed (pardon the pun) to the public.

While it is not yet verified, Apple has said it is “actively investigating” the possibility that iCloud accounts have been hacked.  The photos surfaced immediately after an Apple “Find My iPhone” exploit was revealed, so Apple’s own security is being questioned. As of now, Apple is saying that iCloud has not been systematically hacked, but that the breach of celebrity photos was a limited, targeted attack. Whether or not iCloud was exploited in any way for these pointed attacks hasn’t been determined.

The sad truth is that this most likely boils down to user error (weak passwords by celebrities) rather than a sophisticated hacking attempt.  A brand new exploit, called “iBrute”, allows hackers to try one common password after another until they find one that works and then they can access the iCloud account if they know the email address for the Apple ID (which is probably your regular address).

This is but the tip of the iceberg of cloud-based security hacks.  So, to keep yourself safe on iCloud, change your password and turn on 2-step verification:

  • Login to My Apple ID.
  • Click “Manage your Apple ID” and sign in
  • Select “Password and Security” and answer your security questions (if requested)
  • For starters, reset your Apple ID password and make it a long, strong, alpha-numeric phrase like Th3 h!ll$ @r3 @l!v3 (The hills are alive)
  • Under “Two-Step Verification,” click “Get Started,” and follow the instructions. Two-step verification does take an extra step to login to your account, but it also gives you a layer of security that makes it exceptionally difficult to hack.

John Sileo is an an award-winning author and keynote speaker on identity theft, internet privacy, fraud training & technology defense. John specializes in making security entertaining, so that it works. John is CEO of The Sileo Group, whose clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security & Pfizer. John’s body of work includes appearances on 60 Minutes, Rachael Ray, Anderson Cooper & Fox Business. Contact him directly on 800.258.8076.

Facebook Privacy Settings Get Needed Update

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Facebook Privacy Settings… Some may say it’s too little, too late. I’m relieved that Facebook is finally responding to concerns about their confusing and weak privacy settings.  The social media giant (who has been losing customers of late) has recently made several changes to their settings.

Facebook Privacy Settings Update

  1. Additional photo settings.  Your current profile photo and cover photos have traditionally been public by default. Soon, Facebook will let you change the privacy setting of your old cover photos.
  1. More visible mobile sharing settings.  When you use your mobile phone to post, it is somewhat difficult to find who your audience is because the audience selector has been hidden behind an icon and this could lead to unintended sharing.  In this Facebook privacy settings update, they will move the audience selector to the top of the update status box in a new “To:” field similar to what you see when you compose an email so you’ll be able to see more easily with whom you are sharing.
  1. Default settings for new users.  Instead of automatically defaulting to “public”, new users will now have their default set to “friends”.  They will also be alerted to choose an audience when they post for the first time. This is a significant step in the right direction of a business best practice called Privacy by Default.
  1. Privacy checkup tool.   Users may encounter a “privacy dinosaur” (pictured above) that pops up to lead them through a privacy checkup.  (At this time, it is not a consistent feature: Facebook is “experimenting” with it.) The privacy checkup tool will cover a number of settings, including who they’re posting to, which apps they use, and the privacy of their profile information.
  1. Public posting reminder .  The privacy dinosaur will also remind you when you’re about to post publicly to prevent you from sharing an update with more people than you intended.
  1. Anonymous login.   This feature allows you to log into apps so you don’t have to remember usernames and passwords, but it doesn’t share personal information from Facebook. Traditionally, people using Facebook Login would need to allow the website or app to access certain information in their profiles. I’m also happy to see Facebook moving in this direction, as universal logins are one of the easiest backdoors for cyber criminals to exploit.

Facebook has been criticized for having unreasonably complicated privacy settings, had to pay a $20 million settlement for giving away users’ personal information, and frankly never seemed to care very much about personal privacy.

I’m guessing that Facebook has learned a valuable lesson: that by giving their customers the privacy controls they desire, they are creating happier, more loyal users, which is a long-term strategy for success. The need for change hasn’t disappeared, but these Facebook privacy settings are a step forward.

John Sileo is an an award-winning author and keynote speaker on identity theft, social media privacy, fraud training & technology defense. John specializes in making security entertaining, so that it works. John is CEO of The Sileo Group, whose clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security & Pfizer. John’s body of work includes appearances on 60 Minutes, Rachael RayAnderson Cooper & Fox Business. Contact him directly on 800.258.8076.

Jimmy Carter Exposes 1 of 2 Non-Secrets of World's Most Powerful People

carterThe answer is so simple that you probably won’t believe it.

How do the world’s most powerful, wealthy and well connected people keep their lives more private than the average American?

Former President Jimmy Carter recently revealed one of two truely non-secret tactics that get completely overlooked because of their simplicity: snail mail. When asked about NSA surveillance by NBC’s Andrea Mitchell, Carter responded:

“As a matter of fact, you know, I have felt that my own communications were probably monitored, and when I want to communicate with a foreign leader privately, I type or write the letter myself, put it in the post office and mail it,” Carter said.

Carter’s practice is a clear reminder in the information age: if your communication is digitized, it’s being tracked. We know that thanks to Edward Snowden. Maybe it’s not being tapped by the government, maybe not by a competitor or criminal, but by someone who has something to gain from it, commercially or otherwise. Computers can sort through billions of phone records, emails, Facebook posts, search terms and the likes in a matter of seconds. Intercepting a letter the old-fashioned way? Too time intensive.

So what is the second non-secret that is coming back into vogue? It’s a currency that never reveals behavioral shopping patterns to large marketing firms, can’t be tracked via geo-location software and doesn’t leave digital residue all over the internet. You’ve already guessed the answer: Cash.

If you don’t want your insurance company to purchase your credit card records of McDonald’s purchases (high risk for heart attack), use cash. If you don’t want your credit card number stored in Target’s database, use cash. Nervous about the fact that your bank account number appears on the bottom of every one of your checks (and can fairly easily be cased out with the right tools)? Cash, cash, cash.

I consult on privacy to some of the wealthiest, most powerful people on the planet. Last year, I met in Washington DC with a staff member of a future presidential candidate. What  tools would I immediately implement in their campaign when it came to sensitive communications, she asked? With a nod to Jimmy Carter, here were my suggestions: snail mail, face-to-face meetings, faxing, private chat/text software, data encryption, smash the iPhones/Androids and two-factor authentication for email, Dropbox and all other web accounts.

As for cash? Not feasible in a game where everything has to be tracked and cash has a reputation for bribery and evasion. But for you, cash is an old-fashioned gem with state-of-the-art privacy.

 

 

Snapchat Hacked? Duh! Of Course It Was.

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Snapchat Hacked! Is there any sense of wonder left when another Internet giant (or any corporation, for that matter) gets hacked and loses your private information? No, the mystery died years ago, which is why we’ve basically forgotten about Target already. Of course Snapchat.com was hacked. Here’s the recipe for how your corporation can be like theirs:

  1. Collect a ga-gillion pieces of user data all while…
  2. Paying lip service to privacy and security measures until…
  3. Your database is hacked, the press circles & customers revolt while…
  4. You pay expensive recovery costs and belatedly decide to…
  5. Implement security & privacy measures that could’ve saved you a ga-gillion.

Breach Happens, no matter how big or how small you are. But breach destroys only when you are unprepared.  When it comes to privacy, the most effective medicine is getting burned. Snapchat is lucky to have experienced it early in their lifetime. When will you get hacked? Will it disappear in 11 seconds…

John Sileo inspires corporations to give a darn about the data that drives their profits, before breach happens. 

Privacy Expert: NSA Intercepting Your Address Books, Buddy Lists

Snowden_Leak_Tip_of_the_Iceberg_of_NSA_Surveillance_Program__141492What makes a privacy expert nervous? Glimpsing the size of the iceberg under the surface. When National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden became a whistle blower earlier this year, I think we all knew we were really just seeing the tip of the iceberg about exactly how much information the NSA was gathering on the average American citizen.  And it was a pretty large tip to start with.

Here’s a reminder of what started the whole thing.  Snowden provided reporters at The Guardian and The Washington Post with top-secret documents detailing two NSA surveillance programs being carried out by the U.S. Government, all without the average voter’s knowledge. One gathers hundreds of millions of U.S. phone records and the second allows the government to access nine U.S. Internet companies to gather all domestic Internet usage (so they are tapping pieces of your phone calls and emails, in other words). The intent of each program respectively is to use meta-data (information about the numbers being called, length of call, etc., but not the conversation itself, as far as we know) to detect links to known terrorist targets abroad and to detect suspicious behavior (by monitoring emails, texts, social media posts, instant messaging, chat rooms, etc.) that begins overseas. As a privacy expert, I understand the need to detect connections among terrorists; the troubling part is the scope of the information being gathered. Read more

Higher Education Features Cyber Security Expert John Sileo

Universities perfect learning environment for data security

Higher Ed Organizations are among the highest risk groups to become victims of identity theft and data breach. Because students are relative “beginners” when it comes to personal finances, because university environments are predicated on trust and credibility, and because of the recent progress towards a mobile-centric, social-networking-dominated campus, higher education’s digital footprint is constantly exposed to manipulation.

"The most engaging speaker I've ever heard - period"

“The most engaging speaker I’ve ever heard – period.”  Debbie Bumpous, NSU Chief Information Technology Officer speaking about John Sileo

“John Sileo was the secret sauce in launching our cyber security awareness program” – University of Massachusetts Director of IT

Universities are 357X more likely to be affected by data breach than the average organization. High profile cases, some of which ended in class action lawsuits against the breached university include the University of Nebraska (650,000 breached records at an estimated cost of $92 million), UCLA, Auburn, Delaware, and Texas. Data theft is bad for students, time consuming for the administration and a public relations nightmare for the university. John Sileo knows their pain first hand, as he is generally the person contacted by universities after they have been breached. 

Video: watch John help a university prevent data theft before it happens

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eveXtEku9M&rel=0]

Universities Have a Distinct Advantage in the Fight for Data Privacy

There is genuinely optimistic news amidst the gloom and doom. Because of their teaching facilities, their communication channels and their understanding of pedagogy, universities small and large are uniquely equipped to train campus wide on the simple steps to keep private data secure before it is breached. But it takes the right speaker to introduce security in such a way that it connects with a mixed audience–student and faculty, young and wise, technologically-oriented and digitally-challenged.

John Sileo sets the standard for presentations that get students, faculty and administrators to emotionally connect to the critical nature of privacy, security and identity protection. Using his own personal story of identity theft, John interacts with your audience to gain “buy in” to the increasing importance of securing identity in a mobile-driven, social-media-dominated world.

“If the presentation is boring or overly technical, the campus won’t listen, won’t learn. John is anything but boring…”

Video: Hear what university leaders have to say about John’s ability to make it personal

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eByEVFdF5pY&rel=0]

John has spoken extensively for other universities to increase awareness on privacy, security and identity. Unfortunately, he’s usually brought in AFTER THE BREACH and asked to sign confidentiality agreements that don’t allow him to disclose his work with the university. And if there is someone that respects his client’s right to privacy and confidentiality when requested, John is it. We can say that John has worked with top ranked universities in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Dakota, Nebraska, Florida, New York, Pennsylvania , Washington D.C., Utah, Wyoming and Virginia. We hope that your university/fraternity/organization chooses to proactively address the problem like those public references listed below:

Listen to what Universities have to say about John’s presentations

Wellesley College“Your presentation had the audience engaged from the first moment you started speaking. Data security is so often such a dry topic that it can be very challenging to get our users to listen to anything we have to say (let alone to show up). Your personal stories were both heart wrenching and thought provoking, and they provided an important backdrop for the lessons you were teaching. And you did all of this with humility, and a wonderful sense of humor, that caputred the audience’s attention. When people were leaving the event, many told me it was the best presentation they had ever seen and it was unanimous that was time well spent.”

— Donna Volpe Strouse, Information Security Officer, Wellesley College


 

UMASS“John’s presentation was excellent. He has a unique and skilled way of connecting with the audience and relating personal security to university security initiatives.”

“Felt like a knowledgeable friend grabbed me by the shoulders, slowed me down and saved me from getting into trouble.”

Engaging and entertaining delivery of what is typically a dry topic – it makes the message stick.”

“Compelling, persuasive, intelligent, common sense and passionate presentation that opens your eyes. Funny too!”

— Various CIO Coordinators and Attendees at the Six University of Massachusetts Campuses


 

Seal_of_Northern_State_UniversityThe most engaging speaker I’ve ever heard – period. As part of a campus-wide cyber-security awareness program, Northern State University hosted John Sileo on our campus. John’s presentation was the culmination of a month-long awareness campaign for faculty, staff and students and part of the National Cyber-Security Awareness Month. The presentation itself was of the highest caliber. John personally catered the content of his presentation to our unique and diverse audience members. John is an incredibly motivational presenter that can speak directly to any audience, of any age. Throughout his presentation, he actively engaged members of the audience, capturing and holding their attention. This engagement brought a personal touch to the presentation and underscored the importance of his message. I would highly recommend John Sileo as a presenter or guest speaker. His expertise, friendliness, and professionalism are exemplary.”

— Debbi Bumpous, Chief Information Technology Officer, Northern State University


 

Foundation_LogoThe Delta Gamma Foundation is the heart of the Delta Gamma Fraternity… One of the most successful programs we offer our collegiate and alumnae members is our Lectureship in Values and Ethics. Now present on 15 campuses throughout the United States (with 4 more Delta Gamma chapters in the process of completing their lectureship), our lectureship series has featured such nationally acclaimed speakers as Colin Powell, Queen Noir, Maya Angelou, Barbara Bush, Gerald Ford, Jeff Probst and many more.

On June 18, 2010, at our 64th biennial Convention in Denver, CO, the Delta Gamma Foundation sponsored our Convention Lectureship in Values and Ethics. This lectureship is very special because it is presented to the entire Convention body. Our guest speaker was John D. Sileo who spoke on identity theft prevention… John captivated an audience of 900 ranging in age from 19 to 90 telling his personal story of theft identity and educating all of us to intellectually understand the importance of one’s privacy. John is a story teller who tells a compelling story with humor, intrigue and ongoing audience interaction. The presentation was outstanding.

Delta Gamma continues to receive positive feedback on John’s presentation and performance. On behalf of the Delta Gamma Foundation, we would strongly recommend John for any audience of any age. His story needs to be told and shared.

— Roxanne LaMuth, Delta Gamma Foundation


 

CSC Wordmark 208- 2006John Sileo is the real deal. He speaks because he has something to say, but also because he is interested in his audience! If you host speakers, do yourself a favor and hire John… he will remind you of all that is good about offering a speaker to an audience.

Loree MacNeill, Chadron State College

 

 

Facebook Privacy: New Data Use Policy Banks on User Laziness

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facebook privacy 2Is there such a thing as Facebook privacy? You’ve might have heard that Facebook is proposing a new Data Use Policy and Statement of Rights and Responsibilities (formerly known as a privacy policy). No one refers to it as a Privacy Policy anymore, because there is absolutely no sign of privacy left. And if you read the email from Facebook alerting you to the changes, or even the summary of changes that they provide, you are left with no clear idea of the magnitude of those alterations (you’d have to read the actual suggested changes).

Facebook is masking privacy erosion with a deceptive executive summary. The latest changes make me very uncomfortable in three ways:

  1. It appears that Facebook has left open the option to collect and utilize your mobile phone number when you access Facebook from your mobile device. That is valuable information to advertisers who want to text, call or serve up ads to you directly.
  2. Facebook is already using, and will continue to use facial recognition software to identify photos that you are in (even if they aren’t your photos), and recommend that they be tagged with your identity. Now they are considering adding your profile photo as a benchmark for the facial recognition software. In other words, the minute any photo is put up with you in it, it can be tagged and exposed to the rest of the world. You can change your Timeline & Tagging Settings to stop non-consensual tagging.
  3. By default and unless you make somewhat complicated changes, your photos can be used in advertisements. Any photos you load to Facebook can be served up to your network in connection with items you have “Liked”, which means that your picture (or worse yet, your child’s) can show up next to the raunchy movie you just “Liked”.

As quoted in the British newspaper, The Register, Facebook is practically flaunting your addiction to their social network, knowing you will likely do nothing about it:

“You give us permission to use your name, profile picture, content, and information in connection with commercial, sponsored, or related content (such as a brand you like) served or enhanced by us. This means, for example, that you permit a business or other entity to pay us to display your name and/or profile picture with your content or information, without any compensation to you… You understand that we may not always identify paid services and communications as such.”

Facebook is so confident that you won’t make the necessary changes to your privacy settings (let alone actually deleting your Facebook account), that they can arrogantly announce these changes without fear of reprisal. They are literally banking on your apathy.

There is good news! You have two clear options:

  1. You have 7 days to comment on Facebook’s new policies before they take effect. If there is a strong enough backlash against these erosive changes, they will rethink their position (maybe – or they might just outlast you until you’ve stopped paying attention). But the backlash won’t happen without your input.
  2. You can outright delete your Facebook account, but don’t do it until you have downloaded a copy of your data, posts, pictures and such. Even then, they reserve the right to use the data you already posted for a certain period of time.

In the coming days, I will post a video on how to do both of these items.

John Sileo is a keynote speaker and CEO of The Sileo Group, a privacy think tank that trains organizations to harness the power of their digital footprint. Sileo’s clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security and businesses looking to protect the information that makes them profitable.

 

 

How To Turn Off Facebook Graph Search

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[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0j-mIhbbHQ?rel=0]

Do you want to know how to turn off Facebook Graph Search?

If you walk onto a used-car lot and brag to the salesman that you’re rich, who’s to blame: the salesman for exploiting that information to sell you a car for more than it’s worth, or you for naively sharing in the first place? Both! The same is true in the hacking of the Facebook Graph Search data; Facebook AND poorly informed users SHARE the responsibility for this latest breach.

In case you haven’t heard the latest, Brandon Copley, a mobile developer in Dallas, Texas, was able to exploit Facebook’s Graph Search to collect 2.5 million phone numbers of Facebook users.  Copley is not a malicious hacker; he was simply trying to show how vulnerable the information is that people leave “public” on Facebook.

In a note from Facebook to its users, Facebook acknowledged the “bug”.  They went on to explain how it happened and said they immediately disabled the tool in question until it was fixed.  They also issued a cease and desist letter to Copley stating, “You are unlawfully acquiring Facebook user data. It appears that you are accessing Facebook through automated means and stealing Facebook access tokens in order to scrape data from Facebook’s site without permission.”  Copley argued that, “Facebook is denying its users the right to privacy by allowing our phone numbers to be publicly searchable as the default setting.”

What is Facebook’s responsibility regarding Graph Search?

Facebook is at fault for allowing robo-harvesting of your personal data through Graph Search. They should plug this search engine hole immediately – we’ll see that soon. They also need to plug a series of related breaches.

What is our responsibility as users?

We have to remember that Facebook is a social network, a term that openly admits to the sharing of data, which is why Facebook DOESN’T HAVE a privacy policy, they have a Data Use Policy. And make no mistake; the Facebook Data Use Policy says that by default, they will share everything possible unless we tell them otherwise. In other words, we’re giving them a lot of our information for a pretty used car.

What steps can our viewers take right now? (See video)

  1. Share only what you want made public.  Remember, the default setting is to make everything public; it is your responsibility to go in and change your settings.
  2. Read & understand the Data Use Policy, otherwise, you have no way of knowing how Facebook is making your data available to others.
  3. Customize privacy settings to limit access. To do this well, it will take about 60 minutes of your time, but it will be well worth the effort.

John Sileo is a keynote speaker and CEO of The Sileo Group, a privacy think tank that trains organizations to harness the power of their digital footprint. Sileo’s clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security and businesses looking to protect the information that makes them profitable. Contact him directly on 800-258-8076.