Mobile Device Statistics on Our Children

I found these mobile device statistics on our children’s use of technology to be eye-opening. 38% of kids under 2 have used a mobile device – the digital babysitter, I suppose. Anyway, I think it’s important that we know what direction our kids are heading and what we, as parents, are doing to point them there. Part of security involves access: how much they have, how well they are monitored and what the consequences are for improper use.

Zero_to_Eight_2013_infographic

John Sileo is an author and highly engaging speaker on internet privacy, identity theft and technology security. He is CEO of The Sileo Group, which helps organizations to protect the privacy that drives their profitability. His recent engagements include presentations at The Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security and Northrop Grumman as well as media appearances on 60 MinutesAnderson Cooper and Fox Business. Contact him directly on 800.258.8076.

CryptoLocker Alert: A Virus You Need to Understand

Are you prepared for CryptoLocker, the next wave of Internet virus?

CryptoLocker is the next generation of internet virus that is currently circulating all over the world in large numbers. Once a computer becomes infected it will lock all your files plus any network files it has access to, even your server. Once the files are locked it will give you a three day countdown to pay the ransom, usually $100 or $300. If the time expires your files are locked with no option to pay the ransom.

Currently there are only two known methods to remove the infection, restoring your files from a backup or paying the ransom. Please be aware that paying the ransom is not guaranteed to work. We don’t condone paying the ransom as it supports and encourages these cyber criminals.

What makes CryptoLocker exceptionally dangerous is the fact in most cases it can pass right through all Anti-virus protection suites (my go-to IT security firm for matters like this, Sierra Ridge Networks, is working with their anti virus partners to make sure they provide the most current solutions – make sure your tech guys are doing the same.)

How CryptoLocker Generally Invades Your Systems

  • In the form of attachment, usually disguised in an email appearing to come from your bank, insurance company or courier service or scanner.
  • Through Trojan websites, which will ask you to download a piece of software in order to watch video clips or download songs off the internet.
  • Through malicious websites with names similar to popular ones, waiting for you to mis-type the URL and share as if on your favorite website.

Advice for Preventing the CryptoLocker Virus

  1. Never open attachments if you are unsure of the contents, the sender or if your gut says something isn’t right.
  2. Look for clues in the email content. Most legitimate emails will address you by name and not something generic like ‘customer’ with vague wording.
  3. Misspellings, faulty English, promises of riches, freebies or other bribes are all signs that something is fishy.
  4. Do not click on website links in emails until you have viewed the link location. Do this by hovering over the link, which will display the actual link at the bottom of your email program – if the link and the hyperlinked text don’t match, you’ve got a problem). Instead of clicking the link, you are best to manually type the URL into your browser.
  5. Make sure your anti-virus is updated regularly on EVERY system connected to your network, including mobile devices.
  6. Make sure your backups are current and working and backing up ALL critical data.

If You Get Infected by CryptoLocker

  1. Stop work! TURN OFF YOUR COMPUTER! Shut down your entire network, if possible until help arrives. 
  2. Contact an IT Security specialist. I use Sierra Ridge Networks out of Colorado.
  3. Alert people on your network, as any work completed after infection will be overwritten when the backup is restored.

John Sileo is NOT an IT Security Specialist, but an author and highly engaging speaker on internet privacy, identity theft and technology security. He is CEO of The Sileo Group, which helps organizations to protect the privacy that drives their profitability. His recent engagements include presentations at The Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security and Northrop Grumman as well as media appearances on 60 Minutes, Anderson Cooper and Fox Business. Contact him directly on 800.258.8076.

Internet Privacy & Kids: Social Network Monitoring in Schools

librarians-watching computer useSocial network monitoring becomes big business. Fresh off the heels of learning that the NSA has been gleaning data about us using information found on social networking sites comes the news that a school district in California is paying a monitoring service to watch and report on what students are posting on sites like Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Glendale Unified School District is paying $40,000 over the next year to a company called Geo Listening to monitor its students’ social media activity.  This program was introduced after one of their students, 15-year-old Drew Ferraro, committed suicide by jumping from the roof of Crescenta Valley High School.  It started as a pilot project in three schools last year and is now being rolled out to all middle and high schools across the district.

Glendale is not the first school system to use monitoring services.  They are used fairly commonly at the college level.  Louisville and Kentucky use a social media monitoring system with their athletes that flags words for coaches that relate to drugs, sex or alcohol and they also have access to all of the athletes’ photos and videos.  (LSU, Florida, Texas A&M, Texas, Missouri, Ole Miss, South Carolina, Auburn, Baylor and New Mexico are among the other schools that use similar monitoring methods).

 

Mount Wachusett Community College was one of the first schools to monitor social media on a dedicated level and was recognized for being proactive by the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations.  Robin Duncan, vice president for marketing and communication at MWCC says simply, “If you don’t have someone paying attention to your new media … you’re being negligent.”

In Indiana, a high school senior, Austin Carroll, was expelled from Garrett High School and forced to enroll at an alternate school to get his diploma for a profanity-laden tweet that was flagged by his school’s social media monitoring system.  Many schools that don’t pay for a monitoring service still task their administrators with doing it.

So, while it’s nothing new for schools to monitor their students’ communications (I recall having a few notes intercepted and read by my teachers), it begs some questions:

  • Who should be in charge of monitoring our kids?
  • How much privacy should kids be allowed?
  • To what extent should schools be involved?

The answers are not straight-forward.  When daily reports of government surveillance cause a public outcry over privacy issues, we want to extend those same privileges to our kids.  Yet, there are cases like the Ohio school shooter, T.J. Lane, who killed three classmates and wounded others.  Lane had posted chilling comments on Facebook a few months before and tweeted the morning of the shooting that he was bringing a gun to school.  It was right there, publicly posted, yet no one knew to stop him.

It’s easy to blame the schools, to blame the district, to blame someone else, but as parents, WE should be the ones to monitor our kids’ posts…

  • WE need to remind them that all posts are permanent, public and exploitable – forever.
  • WE need to look for warning signs of violent intentions toward self or others, substance abuse, bullying…
  • WE need to get off our own Facebook pages and check in on our kids.
  • We need to have engaging, heart-to-heart conversations with our kids so that they feel we are the ones to reach out to when the dark days come.

The truth, however, is that some (okay-most) parents don’t do it.  As with countless other issues that we have come to expect our schools to teach (sex education, drug resistance, anti-bullying), keeping up with social media is something most parents aren’t comfortable with, don’t understand completely, or just don’t want to deal with. And that unwillingness has disastrous consequences for kids who are troubled, in trouble, or the victim of another troubled child.

Ralph Hicks, superintendent of Ashburnham-Westminster Regional School District in Massachusetts, explains that the legal doctrine “in loco parentis,” which is Latin for “in place of a parent” allows school officials to interfere in the lives of students only in issues involving the school.  More and more, that definition involves anything said about the school (or students and staff) whether the communication occurs on campus or not.

Parents (and students) who think that this monitoring is a violation of their kid’s privacy should remember that EVERYTHING BEING MONITORED IS ALREADY PUBLICSchools aren’t breaking into your child’s Facebook account, they are simply monitoring what everyone else on the Internet can see. And if it saves a life, thwarts a bully, or rescues a child in need, it’s worth it. 

John Sileo is a keynote speaker on Internet Privacy and CEO of  The Sileo Group, a think tank that trains organizations to harness the power of their digital footprint. Sileo’s clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security and businesses looking to protect the information that makes them profitable.

Interview with Reputation.com on Business Identity Fraud and Online Reputation

reputationcomDo you want to know how businesses can protect themselves and enhance their online reputations?

Would you like to know the answers to the following questions?  

  • Are businesses adequately protecting themselves online? If not, what more should they be doing?
  • What is business fraud and how does it differ from consumer fraud?
  • What should companies be thinking about when they get involved with social media?
  • What can businesses do to monitor their online reputation?
  • Should companies respond to everything negative said about them online? If not, what should they focus on?
  • Should businesses be paying attention to their employees online? If so, how can they do that in an ethical way?
  • What is the most important advice you would give a new business just starting to develop an online presence?

To learn the answers to these important questions, read the interview I recently did with Reputation.com.