FaceApp Privacy

FaceApp is Fun, But Putin Will Own Your Privacy

FaceApp quite literally owns your face forever (or atleast the image of your face).

It’s funny how we spend billions of dollars a year on health and beauty products and treatments designed to keep us looking, as Carrie Underwood sings, “young and beautiful”, but when a fun app comes along that gives us a goofy look or makes us look 30 years older, we jump at the chance to see it and share it with all of our friends on Social Media.  That’s exactly the case with FaceApp, an app that alters photos to make you look years older or alter facial expressions, looks, etc.  Thanks in part to use by celebrities such as Underwood, the Jonas Brothers and LeBron James, more than 150 million users have uploaded their photos to the app and it is now the top-ranked app on the iOS App Store in 121 countries. Free, fun and harmless, right?  Maybe, maybe not…

Every app is uploading your data and daily habits and locations, combining it with your social media profile and exploiting or selling it. That’s the profit model of the internet, not just FaceApp. That’s not what makes this particular app unique or noteworthy.  Wireless lab, creators of FaceApp is based in St. Petersburg, Russia, which means that by default, Vladimir Putin has a picture of you someplace on his hard driveLet’s be clear, Russia can get into any centralized database of facial recognition photos it wants to – this just makes it easier for them.

Not only that, but FaceApp retains a perpetual license to utilize your photo in any way it sees fit. In their words you are granting FaceApp “a perpetual, irrevocable, nonexclusive, royalty-free, worldwide, fully-paid, transferable sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, publicly perform and display your User Content and any name, username or likeness provided in connection with your User Content in all media formats and channels now known or later developed, without compensation to you”.

This makes it not just a privacy issue, but also a security issue, as there is no guarantee that your photos and device data are stored securely. In fact, there is almost no chance that they are stored securely. In addition to your photo, some other personal information is transmitted, and you are never alerted to the fact that either are being uploaded.

For now, it seems that they are only uploading the photo that you choose to upload, but I see no reason why they won’t slyly begin uploading every photo in your album as their terms of service don’t preclude that evolution. Facebook didn’t always collect and sell our information as they do now, but that didn’t stop them when profit is involved.  Information collection companies start by collecting very little until we stop paying attention, and then they transmit everything. They love the slippery slope of boiling the privacy frog!

So-what can you do about it?

  • The Democratic National Committee sent out a warning to campaigns recently telling people to delete the apps from their phone.  It’s a start, but deleting the app doesn’t get rid of your data in the cloud, and doing so is time-consuming and confusing.
  • For the fastest processing, try sending the requests from the FaceApp mobile app using ‘Settings->Support->Report a bug’ with the word ‘privacy’ in the subject line.
  • If it’s not too late, resist the urge to download the app!  Maybe look at a picture of your parents instead.

Most importantly, the next time you are giving away access to your photos or allowing any app to access data on your phone, read their privacy or data use policy first. You will be amazed at what you are giving away for free that makes them gobs of money.

John Sileo loves his role as an “energizer” for cyber security at conferences, corporate trainings, and industry events. He specializes in making security fun so that it sticks. His clients include the Pentagon, Schwab and many organizations so small (and security conscious) that you won’t have even heard of them. John has been featured on 60 Minutes, recently cooked meatballs with Rachel Ray and got started in cyber security when he lost everything, including his $2 million software business, to cybercrime. Call if you would like to bring John to speak to your members – 303.777.3221.

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