Financial Planners: Give Your Clients Mobile Security this Holiday Season

Santa in summerWrap Up Your Mobile Security this Holiday Season!

Your clients compute almost as much on mobile devices as on desktop computers. They read banking and investment emails on their smartphones, log in to sensitive financial accounts via their iPad and store mission critical data on their laptops. But along with the freedom and efficiency of mobile computing comes a great deal of risk – risk that threatens their net worth. Small devices are easier to lose, simple to steal and are tempting targets for data theft. And to top it all off, your clients protect their mobile devices like mere phones and book readers, instead of the computers they really are.

So, if you are thinking ahead about what to get your best clients for the holidays, we have the answer.   How about a thorough list of privacy prevention practices to get them safely from Black Friday through New Year’s Eve?  Sure beats a reindeer sweater or a fruitcake!

Gather a group of your best clients and treat them to an hour of tried and true practical ideas to safeguard their privacy.  You provide the cookies and eggnog, we will provide the expertise and your clients will appreciate the useful gift!

We will provide simple, actionable tools to protect and enhance the mobile tools your clients use to do business. You will learn how to add value to your clients by helping them:

  • Lock down smartphones and tablets from thieves
  • Track mobile devices if stolen or misplaced
  • Safely use free Wi-Fi hotspots in cafés, airports and hotels
  • Determine which apps are safe and which aren’t
  • Evaluate mobile banking and investment apps

In addition to mobile security, we can customize the speech to cover other holiday hot topics, such as:

  • Protecting your identity from being stolen (think of poor George Bailey) at this busy time of year.
  • Becoming aware of what you unwittingly share on social media sites during the holidays.
  • Preventing your holiday parties at home or at work from becoming sources of data theft.

We’ll tie it all into a holiday theme to keep an edge of humor and the holiday spirit, all while delivering seriously practical ideas to protect your clients.  (Click here for a sample.)

Limited dates available. 

Call us today to secure your date The Sileo Group 303-777-3221

John Sileo is a keynote speaker and CEO of The Sileo Group, a privacy think tank that trains organizations to harness the power of their digital footprint. Sileo’s clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security, Van Wyk Risk and Financial Management and businesses looking to protect the information that makes them profitable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keeping Grounded When the Surveillance Accusations Start to Fly

NSAI’m in the business of encouraging people to keep their guard up.  I’m always telling people to watch for signs of something that doesn’t feel quite right, take precautionary measures, and stay informed.  But even I have to question the tactics some are recommending when it comes to reacting to the NSA PRISM surveillance program leaked by Edward Snowden.  In a previous post on this topic, I said it isn’t a black or white argument, but some people are asking you to make it one.

Best-selling author, technology expert and Columbia Law School professor, Tim Wu, has said that web users have a responsibility to quit Internet companies like Google, Facebook, Apple, Yahoo and Skype if it is indeed verified that they have been collaborating with the NSA.  In fact, Wu bluntly proclaimed, “Quit Facebook and use another search engine. It’s simple.  It’s nice to keep in touch with your friends. But I think if you find out if it’s true that these companies are involved in these surveillance programs you should just quit.”  Wu acknowledged that there is still much to learn about this program and admitted it was no surprise that PRISM exists, saying, “When you have enormous concentrations of data in a few hands, spying becomes very easy.”

Of course, the companies in question vehemently deny such complicit cooperation.  Google CEO Larry Page stated, “any suggestion that Google is disclosing information about our users’ Internet activity on such a scale is completely false.  Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said reports of Facebook’s involvement are “outrageous,” adding  “Facebook is not and has never been part of any program to give the U.S. or any other government direct access to our servers.”  Yahoo’s Ron Bell stated, “The notion that Yahoo! gives any federal agency vast or unfettered access to our users’ records is categorically false.”  Similar statements were issued by from spokespersons for Apple, Microsoft and others accused of complying.

To add fuel to the fire of this debate, top US intelligence officials have stepped forth with their own comments.  US Director of National Intelligence James Clapper asserts the National Security Agency’s PRISM program is “not an undisclosed collection or data mining program” but instead “an internal government computer system used to facilitate the government’s statutorily authorized collection of foreign intelligence information.”

In addition, claims that the sweeping surveillance programs have prevented multiple attacks keep swelling.  Immediately following the leak, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers cited one attack that he said was thwarted by the program, but would not give specifics.  Since that time, however, there have been dozens of reports of foiled terrorist attempts, from a plot to bomb the New York Stock Exchange to an attack against the New York subway system, that were prevented because of the surveillance.  Army Gen. Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Agency, said more than 50 attacks have been averted.  Alexander also stated that Snowden’s leaks have caused “irreversible and significant damage to this nation” and undermined the U.S. relationship with allies.

No doubt, the debate over the propriety, as well as the effect, of Snowden’s actions will rage on for some time.  There will be others who recommend and take drastic actions, such as quitting the Internet giants, for fear of their safety and/or privacy.  The key is to keep cool, find the facts and then NOT forget. The biggest risk is that our discomfort will be forgotten in a week when the next big topic arises. You can take the reasonable steps of doing your research, acting in calculated moderation and following through on what YOU feel is important.

John Sileo is a keynote speaker and CEO of The Sileo Group, a privacy think tank that trains organizations to harness the power of their digital footprint. Sileo’s clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security and businesses looking to protect the information that makes them profitable.

Talking Surveillance Once Again–Know Your Phone Carrier More Precisely

phone moneyWhen you log onto the Verizon Precision Market Insights website, the giant catch phrase that jumps out at you in bold red letters is:

“Know your audience more precisely.

Drive your business more effectively.”

Verizon is pulling no punches when it comes to letting advertisers know that they have valuable data- OUR data- and they’re willing to share it.  For a price of course.  Phone carriers, who see a continued decline in contract subscriber growth and voice calls, are hoping to generate new sources of revenue by selling the data they collect about us.  They already collect information about user location and Web surfing and application use (which informs them about such things as travels, interests and demographics) to adjust their networks to handle traffic better.  Now they have begun to sell this data.

Note: Verizon customers can OPT-OUT of this data sharing by logging into their accounts online and following the opt-out instructions. I recommend that you do so immediately.

Instead of seeing themselves just as providers of valuable services to their customers by providing a means of communication, carriers now see the potential profit beyond the service.  Businesses such as malls, stadiums and billboard owners can gather information about the activities and backgrounds of cellphone users in particular locations.  For example, Verizon’s data service is being used by the Phoenix Suns to map where people attending its games live “in order to increase advertising in areas that haven’t met expectations”, according to Scott Horowitz, a team vice president.

In Verizon’s own words, their analytics platforms allows companies to:

  • Understand the demographic, geographic and psychographic makeup of (their) target audience.
  • Isolate where consumer groups work and live, the traffic patterns of a target audience and demographic information about
what groups visit particular locations.
  • Learn what mobile content (their) target audience is most likely to consume so (they) can cross-sell and up-sell more easily.

The program does not include information from Verizon’s government or corporate clients and individuals do have the right to opt out on Verizon’s website.  Some European companies have launched similar programs and Jeff Weber of AT&T says they are studying ways to analyze and sell customer data while giving users a way to opt out, but at this point they do not have a similar product.

Carriers do acknowledge the privacy issues related to such data surveillance and companies say they don’t sell data about individuals but rather about groups of people. But Chris Soghoian, a privacy specialist at the American Civil Liberties Union, is worried according to an article in the Wall Street Journal.  In it, he says “the ability to profit from customer data could give wireless carriers an incentive to track customers more precisely than connecting calls requires and to store even more of their Web browsing history. That could broaden the range of data about individuals’ habits and movements that law enforcement could subpoena.  It’s the collection that’s the scary part, not the business use.”

In other words, it’s about more than well-meaning companies collecting our data; it’s that their company databases are vulnerable to attacks by hackers, competitors and foreign governments. And when a breach happens, it’s our data that goes missing.

John Sileo is a keynote privacy speaker and CEO of The Sileo Group, a privacy think tank that trains organizations to harness the power of their digital footprint. Sileo’s clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security and businesses looking to protect the information that makes them profitable. Watch John on 60 Minutes, Anderson Cooper and Fox Business.

Summer School for Parents: Protecting Your Kids' Social Media Privacy

girls phones summerSchool is out for the summer and the tasks that often fall upon the shoulders of your local schools are now sitting squarely on yours.   In addition to making sure your kids practice their math facts, read regularly and get plenty of exercise, you’ll want to watch out for how they spend their free time when it comes to using Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and other sites that can expose their social media privacy.

Social Media refers to web-based and mobile applications that allow individuals and organizations to create, engage, and share new user-generated or existing content in digital environments through multi-way communication.  Okay, that’s too technical. Social media is the use of Internet tools to communicate with a broader group. Some of the most common examples are listed above.  If you have elementary aged children, they may use more secure, school-controlled forms such as Schoology, Edmodo or Club Penguin, but if your kids are older, I can almost guarantee they’re into Social Media sites whether you know if or not.

Statistics show that 73% of online adolescents visit social networking sites daily and two billion video clips are watched daily on YouTube.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recently conducted a study that found that 22 percent of teenagers log onto their favorite social media sites more than 10 times a day, and that 75 percent own cell phones.

So, how do you battle such a time-consuming, captivating influence over your children?  You don’t, because you won’t win!  Instead you look at social media privacy best practices that schools implement and do the same at home.

  • Expect the Internet to be used appropriately and responsibly and set agreements and consequences with your children if it is not.  The Family Online Safety Institute can guide your discussion and even provide a contract.
  • Expand your typical discussions about strangers to include social media
    • Don’t accept unknown friend requests
    • Don’t give out personal info – specifically: last name, phone number, address, birthdate, pictures, password, location
  • Warn kids about the dangers of clicking on pop-up ads or links with tempting offers, fun contests, or interesting questionnaires, even if they’re sent from a friend.  They may really want that free iPad being offered, but chances are it’s just a way for someone to glean their personal information.
  • Monitor the information your kids give out and their use of sites; let your children know they should have no expectation of privacy.  (Make that part of your contract.)  You can also install filtering software to monitor their social media use and even their cell phones.  A few popular ones are Net Nanny and PureSight PC to help keep your child safe online and My Mobile Watchdog to help with monitoring their cell phones.
  • Check your privacy settings for all Internet sites and make sure they are set to the strictest levels.
  • Remind your child that once it’s published, social media is public, permanent, and exploitable forever- even when “deleted”
  • If your children are not 13, keep them off of Facebook since that is their stated age limit. There are plenty of reasons, not the least of which involves the emotional repercussions of being “unfriended” or cyber bullied.  When they are ready, have your children read and study the actual Facebook user agreement and privacy policy and discuss it with them.
  • Set limits on social networking time and cell phone time, just as you would for TV hours. Many families limit total screen time, which includes everything from computers, iPads, smartphones, and video games to our old fashioned notion of television.
  • Be a good example yourself.  Monitor your own amount of time spent online and seek to find a balance of activities. When you are on you iPhone at dinner, you are letting your kids know that this is acceptable behavior.
  • Monitor your child’s activities and try to stay educated about the latest platforms!

Social Media can be a positive way for kids to continue to develop friendships while they’re home for the summer and to feel like they’re connected to a community that matters more to them than anything.  But there are risks that come with it and it’s your job as a parent to protect them from those risks just as surely as you keep them from taking candy from a stranger

Social networking has an addictive component because dopamine (a natural feel-good drug produced by the body) is released anytime we talk about ourselves. And what is social networking if not a constant exposé of what is happening in our lives? Just make sure you know what is happening in your child’s life, even in the more relaxed months of summer.

John Sileo is an online privacy expert and professional speaker on social media privacy. His clients include the Department of Defense, Pfizer, Visa, and Homeland Security. See his recent media appearances on 60 Minutes, Anderson Cooper and Fox Business.

 

Social Media Privacy Laws Provide Protection for Employers and Employees

Do you know your social media privacy rights as they pertain to your workplace?

They will be different depending on where you live because the laws vary from state to state. Utah recently became the fifth state to put into effect such a law that governs the rights of both employees and employers. Legislation has also been introduced or is pending at the Federal level and in 35 states.

This has become a hot topic because more than 90 percent of employers use social media sites to help screen applicants. Since applicants have the ability to determine their online privacy settings to decide what is out there for public viewing, some employers have asked for access to their private social media content to get the real picture.

In addition, employers contend that having access to social media accounts of employees allows them to protect sensitive company information such as trade secrets and financial figures. Employees argue that the information may be used to discriminate against them and inherently invades their privacy. In reality, most of the current legislation actually seeks to protect both sides.

Utah’s Internet Employment Privacy Act enforces protection of employees’ online identities, dictating that an “employer may not request disclosure of information related to [a] personal Internet account.” Also known as House Bill 100, this law, which applies to both employees and applicants, includes asking for usernames and passwords. If employers are found guilty of this, they may face up to a $500 fine. Additionally, the law states that employers may not “take adverse action, fail to hire, or otherwise penalize” anyone who will not disclose their information.

There are exceptions built in to protect the employer. They may legally require such information if the employer has provided the device and/or service or if the information is needed to carry out a disciplinary investigation, particularly if the employee’s actions in some way compromise the company – i.e. sharing of proprietary/confidential information or financial data. In addition, the employer can still view publicly available information in order to conduct due diligence.

In the ever-changing world of social media privacy legislation, one thing is clear; it will keep changing! Both employees and employers should check the current status in their state. The National Conference of State Legislatures provides a good listing to help you do this. As always, know your rights and act on your responsibilities.

John Sileo is a social media privacy expert and professional speaker on building digital trust. His clients include the Department of Defense, Pfizer, Visa, and Homeland Security. See his recent media appearances on 60 Minutes, Anderson Cooper and Fox Business.